Towards a Safer Khayelitsha

The Report of the Commission of Inquiry
into Allegations of Police Inefficiency and
a Breakdown in Relations between SAPS
and the Community in Khayelitsha
Click here to view the Final Report August 2014

All the documents that formed part of the Commission’s deliberations are now on the website under the ‘Bundles’ menu.

Inspection in Loco Conducted on 21 and 22 January 2014

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  • Commissioners
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  • FCS-Unit
  • Harare-PS_20140121_99999_1062
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  • Harare-Park
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Amanda Dissel

amanda-finalAmanda Dissel has a BA and LLB degree from the University of the Witwatersrand. She practiced law as an attorney from 1991 to 1994.

Amanda Dissel joined the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) in 1994 where she was Manager of the Criminal Justice Programme for 15 years. During this period she was involved in research, policy-based advocacy and direct interventions related to policing, imprisonment and rehabilitation of offenders, torture prevention, restorative justice, child justice and crime prevention. While at CSVR she was part of a team that compiled a series of research papers on the violent nature of crime that was commissioned by the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security Cluster of government.

Since leaving the CSVR in 2009, Ms Dissel has worked as an independent consultant on a range of projects. In regard to policing, her work has included research in several southern African countries including Lesotho, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. She was involved in drafting indicators for the implementation of the Code of Conduct for the Southern African Regional Chiefs of Police Cooperation Organization (SARPCCO) and in compiling an assessment of policing against these standards. She has also been involved in research on gender based violence and policing in the Southern African Region for the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC); and for the Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa conducted a scoping study on the nexus between the criminal justice system and mental and intellectual disability in Zambia.  Her work has also looked at safety and security concerns facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals (LGBTI).

Amanda Dissel also serves as the delegate in South Africa for the Geneva-based Association for the Prevention of Torture (APT).

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Amanda Dissel has a BA and LLB degree from the University of the Witwatersrand. She practiced law as an attorney from 1991 to 1994.

 

Amanda Dissel joined the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) in 1994 where she was Manager of the Criminal Justice Programme for 15 years. During this period she was involved in research, policy-based advocacy and direct interventions related to policing, imprisonment and rehabilitation of offenders, torture prevention, restorative justice, child justice and crime prevention. While at CSVR she was part of a team that compiled a series of research papers on the violent nature of crime that was commissioned by the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security Cluster of government.

 

Since leaving the CSVR in 2009, Ms Dissel has worked as an independent consultant on a range of projects. In regard to policing, her work has included research in several southern African countries including Lesotho, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. She was involved in drafting indicators for the implementation of the Code of Conduct for the Southern African Regional Chiefs of Police Cooperation Organization (SARPCCO) and in compiling an assessment of policing against these standards. She has also been involved in research on gender based violence and policing in the Southern African Region for the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC); and for the Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa conducted a scoping study on the nexus between the criminal justice system and mental and intellectual disability in Zambia.  Her work has also looked at safety and security concerns facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals (LGBTI).

 

Amanda Dissel also serves as the delegate in South Africa for the Geneva-based Association for the Prevention of Torture (APT).